Books

Personal Finance Book List: Edition #1

I absolutely love to read, and recommending books to others is an absolute joy. Today I want to introduce you to some fantastic books to read on your personal finance journey. They cover a range of topics from investing to minimalism.

The Year of Less — Cait Flanders

This is a phenomenal book that really makes you examine your relationship with the stuff in your life, and whether you are a mindful consumer. Cait provides a refreshing and honest view of she overcame her unhealthy relationship with money and material possessions. The book definitely made me start selling my unused items on Gumtree and think about my purchasing decisions. Ask yourself — ‘Do I really need it?’

The Simple Path to Wealth — JL Collins

If you’re looking for a book that gives you a no-nonsense approach to planning your financial future with the greatest level of ease possible, then this book is the one for you. Although written from a US perspective, JL certainly includes useful aspects in this book for all readers and is a huge advocate of making money simple and easy to understand. One of the reasons so many people stay away from the share market, is the sheer number of products and companies out there to choose from, but JL cuts through the noise and points you in the direction of index funds, or ETFs (for Australians) and examines the simple math behind building wealth through it.

The $1000 Project — Canna Campbell

This book has a big focus on starting your saving and investing journey, by breaking it down into achievable $1000 chunks. She goes through most of the traditional money saving methods such as selling your old stuff and renting out a room while putting her own spin on it. It’s worth a read if you want some help in setting your financial goals and intentions out.

Unf**k Your Finances — Melissa Brown

This is the financial freedom handbook for Gen X & Y. In this book, Melissa teaches you how to ‘financially adult’, by helping you sort out your financial life, become financially resilient and finally to become financially well. The book breaks down key financial concepts into easily digestible bites, from your financial goals to debt. Melissa runs an accounting and financial planning business and is a regular writer in Australian financial publications.

People say that money is not the key to happiness, but I always figured if you have enough money you can have a key made. ~Joan Rivers

Millennial Money — Patrick O’Shaughnessy

Patrick uses this book to explore one of young people’s greatest advantages, ‘the chance to build a fortune by making early investments in the stock market’. He clearly steps out how to get started, and reminds young people that holding cash over time erodes your purchasing power. The book introduces three key principles to follow when investing in the stock market: go global, be different, and get out of your own way.

Feel free to let me know your favourite personal finance books in the comments below.

Until next time,

Kate